The World Trade Center Horror - Day 2 and 3
September 12 and 13, 2001
Photographs by Frank X. Didik

Notice on publication rights: When I wrote the information and shot the photographs on September 11 and the following few days, I did not have any intention of commercializing this tragedy and what I saw. Many media companies and publishers have pointed out that this is a unique historic archive and that by publication, it serves as a tribute and memorial to this tragedy. For this reason, requests for publication of any photographs or text will be considered on a case by case basis. Altogether, I shot about 1,000 digital 1 megapixel photographs on September 11 through September 28, 2001. In addition, high quality, night photographs of the light memorial are available. Thumb nail images of some of the photographs are or will be available for review at: http://www.didik.com/NYCinPictures/wtc For details on publication rights and terms, please send an email to fdidik@didik.com. Please note that I strictly forbid the publication of any of my photographs that may contain graphic gore. I want to preserve the proper memory for those who suffered and their families. Between March and July, 2001, I photographed every building in Manhattan south of 72 Street including the entire area around the former World Trade Center. These photographs (covering the area prior to the World Trade Center disaster) are also available for publication. For this you may wish to log onto http://www.NYCinPictures.com or http://www.NEWS1.net. Thank you

Some images of how these remarkable buildings appeared just a few days ago.

Most of the photographs shown below were taken
 north of Houston Street and south of 14 Street
Click on photographs to enlarge.


Volunteers providing free drinks and food on West 11 Street and 6 Avenue for people who were forced to leave their apartments in lower Manhattan.

An injured policeman.

A bulletin board with photographs of hundreds of people who are missing.

Families and friends of the missing are seeking information, any information on their loved ones. This is at Ray's Pizza on 6 Avenue and 11 Street.

It is very sad and hard to read the information wanted posters that can be seen everywhere.

Union Square (14 Street between Park Avenue S. and Broadway), has become a memorial area .

People on Union Square , by the hundreds, or perhaps thousands have been writing their feelings on slips of paper.

Tibetan Budists, by the hundreds, chanting in a memorial at Union Square Park. Union Square has emerged as a central gathering place for impromptu memorial services and candle light vigils.

With the loss of the World Trade Center, the Empire State Building is again the tallest building in New York City.

Many, many New Yorkers are wearing masks to block the air which has a burning plastic smell and out of fear of hazardous substances.

A man wearing a face mask and carrying a flag on West Houston Street.


Info wanted posters.

West Houston Street, which is a very large cross town road in lower Manhattan, has become a staging area for heavy equipment used in the rescue/recovery.

National Guards men and women are seen throughout the City.


A restaurant on West Houston Street giving free food to rescuers

Nationalistic symbols are seen everywhere.

West Houston Street.

This is a very sad view. This is 6th Avenue, looking south towards what in the past would be the World Trade Center buildings. Hundreds of people silently stare south in disbelief.

Flags and patriotic statements are visible everywhere.

AN ACCOUNT OF ESCAPE: One person described an interesting escape from One World Trade Center, which was the first building hit, but the second building to collapse. The individual worked on the 81 floor. At about 8:45 AM, he heard and felt a large bang. At first, he did not know what had happened, but then, about 15 minutes later, he saw the explosion of World Trade Center Two and knew that it was time to leave. He took the elevator, which worked but then stopped suddenly at about the 50th floor. Luckily the elevator had stopped at a floor and he was able to open the door. He then ran towards the staircase and ran down a few floors, but as he continued to run, the smoke in the stairwell became worse and worse and he decided to leave the stairwell. The floor that he entered was completely vacant. As he tried to think of what to do next, he saw people falling from the building outside and he decided that, no matter what, he had to use the stairwell. He continued to run down the stairs through ever thicker smoke and eventually reached street level. He continued to run. Shortly thereafter, WTC2 collapsed. This account provides interesting information. Apparently, the evacuation of the two buildings started immediately after the first plane hit WTC1. Further, it shows that the buildings were substantially evacuated prior to collapsing. As shown in the above photographs, hundreds of flyers looking for missing people have been posted around the city, searching for any information on these individuals. After reading a number of these flyers, it is apparent that the vast majority of the missing people were working on the top floor of WTC1 and to a lesser degree, WTC2. It would seem that escape above the floors of the airline impact was very difficult. Perhaps the heat and fire prevented escape. Currently, the number of missing and known dead is just under 4600 people. A terrible and senseless loss of human life.

MANHATTAN SITUATION Sept 12/13, 2001: The situation in lower Manhattan, north of the disaster is surreal. People are silently walking around, still in a state of shock. Many people are wearing masks to shield themselves from the plastic smell and from possible pollutants in the air. The city is strangely quite since the roads south of 14 Street, are completely void of cars, except for emergency vehicles. All roads leading south from 14 Street have police check points and road blocks. The west side of Manhattan, south of Harrison Street is without electricity and has been evacuated. The tens of thousands of residents who had lived in the relatively newly built Battery Park City have moved in with friends, or in some cases, with the many people who have out of kindness, volunteered rooms in their apartment. Most stores are closed as are any entertainment facilities, such as movie theaters and restaurants. A number of restaurants are offering free food to anyone involved in the rescue/recovery effort. Everyone, including all law enforcement officers, are very polite. Police and firemen from as far away as Ohio are patrolling the streets. The Manhattan, Brooklyn and Williamsburg Bridges are all closed, except for emergency traffic. All government buildings, such as post offices, police stations and other buildings have intense security.

 I walked past the Arabic area on Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn and noticed a substantial police presence. A number of Arab owned businesses are displaying the US flag. Patriotic symbols and slogans can be seen everywhere. In Manhattan, along Broadway, between 59 Street up to 70 Street, I noticed that someone had written ant-Arab statements in phone booths, using a magic marker. I think that this is an exception to the norm.

Click here to read the account and see photographs, the day of the disaster.